Stimulating Diaspora, Stimulating Growth – Post-Conflict Change in Kosovo

Stimulating Diaspora, Stimulating Growth – Post-Conflict Change in Kosovo

Senior Advisor Pamela Ronai shares her thoughts and insights on the best ways to engage the diaspora of post-conflict regions, and the market-driven BiD Network approach in Kosovo.

The BiD Network faced a considerable challenge when it began working to stimulate economic growth in the post-conflict (MFS II) countries targeted by the Dutch government for development aid from citizen sector organizations. The “United Entrepreneurship Coalition” (UEC), an innovative and young alliance consisting of SPARK and BiD Network, received € 4.7 million for this purpose from the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs in November 2010.

This funding, dispensed over five years, allows the UEC to work closely with a selection of partners to empower entrepreneurs and create employment opportunities in the five MFS II countries: Palestine, Kosovo, Burundi, Liberia, and Rwanda. One and a half years into the program, BiD Network is working closely with eight partners in the five post-conflict countries that have the capacity and creativity to create a promising business environment for small businesses.

Read the full article on Changemakers website.

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